On weekend wondering Dave chats with River Night The research carried out by Developing Australian Communities finds over a third (34%) of Australians are not confident they are using the correct terminology when referring to someone with a disability. River says we should  Think before you speak  to avoid unintentionally offending someone with a disability.

 

Shocking new research reveals one-in-two Australians have used an offensive term to describe a person living with a disabilityOne-in-three Australians are not confident they know the politically correct terms when referring to someone with a disabilityDeveloping Australian Communities is encouraging Australians to think before they speak and educate themselves on the correct terminology

 

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Shocking new research reveals as many as one-in-two (48%) Aussies have used an offensive term to describe a person living with a disability. With continuously changing terminology, we may all be guilty of using a term we instantly regretted but the research shows this is a more common experience for Australians than you might think. It’s time we faced this issue head on, start being proactive in being inclusive and think before we speak.

The research carried out by Developing Australian Communities finds over a third (34%) of Australians are not confident they are using the correct terminology when referring to someone with a disability. In fact, one-in-five (18%) are completely clueless and have ‘no idea which wording to use’ with one in three (36%) confessing to unintentionally using offensive terms.

In today’s progressive society, we are constantly re-evaluating what terms are appropriate and what are not. The younger generations are leading the way with three-quarters (77%) of Gen Z feeling confident that they know the right terminology to use when referring to someone with a disability, with confidence dropping by 14% for mature Australians.

Using offensive language, inadvertently or not, has a negative impact on our communities and leads to miscommunication and misunderstandings. Feeling misunderstood contributes to individuals feeling isolated and disconnected from the world around them, increasing exclusive behaviours in society.

Developing Australian Communities is calling for Australians to think before they speak and proactively learn the appropriate language and terminology, to build trust within the community and contribute to a more inclusive and respectful society for Australians living with a disability.