Brooke Oakley from the BOM tells Dave about the record rain event on May 10/11

Heavy rainfall and damaging winds in the south and east
 South eastern Tasmania experienced heavy rainfall overnight, especially in the
Hobart area which received 129.2 mm in the 24 hours to 9am Friday (43.4 mm in
one hour from 10-11pm).
 In many cases this was the wettest day for Hobart since 23 April 1960; Hobart's
129.2 mm is its fourth highest on record and only the fifth time with more than
100 mm.
 Other areas of the state that received heavy rainfall include:
o Grove (160 mm), which is its wettest day on record since 23 April 1960
o Mt Wellington (236.2 mm), which is a site record and the second highest
May total for Tasmania since 18 May 1986.

 Rain will continue today in the east and southeast before easing later in the day
with the focus of heavy falls moving into the east and northeast 30-60 mm
expected, but possibly higher totals with thunderstorms.
 Minor Flood Warnings are in place for the Derwent, Huon and North Esk Rivers,
and a Flood Watch remains for the eastern half of Tasmania. Keep up to date at
www.bom.gov.au/tas/warnings/
 Wind speeds so far have peaked at 131 km/h at Mt Wellington with other notable
speeds including 119 km/h at Tasman Island and 109 km/h at Cape Grim. Hobart
received 89 km/h winds.
 A Severe Weather Warning is current for damaging south to southeasterly winds
during Friday and heavy rain about eastern and northeastern districts and elevated
areas of central and southeast districts. Keep up to date at
www.bom.gov.au/tas/warnings/
 Damaging southeasterly winds are possible across most of the state except parts of
the west and northwest.
 The heavy rainfall and damaging winds are due to a complex area of low pressure
that lies east of Flinders Island.
 A Sheep Graziers Warning and a Road Weather Alert are also current for areas of
the state, full details including locations at www.bom.gov.au/tas/warnings/
 Saturday will see rain easing to 2-5mm in the south, possibly 5-10mm in elevated
areas.